April 23, 2015

Kernel development for OpenEmbedded with Eclipse

by Yuri Nenakhov

Eclipse with C Development Tool (CDT) is a very powerful and feature-rich IDE for developing embedded Linux applications, such as Elphel393 camera. CDT includes CODAN — static code analysis tool which helps user to track possible problems in his code without compiling it, and Code Indexer, giving an auto-complete and code navigating (F3) features. They work independently from compiler, thus parsing the code in the same manner as compiler does is essential for producing meaningful results. As project grows, the interconnections between its parts tend to become more and more complicated, and maintaining the congruency of code processing for compiler and CODAN/Code Indexer becomes a non-trivial task. In the Internet, the most frequent recommendation for users who wish to develop Linux kernel with Eclipse is to disable CODAN feature since messy false error markers make it practically unusable. The situation becomes even worse for developers using external build tools (such as OpenEmbedded’s BitBake) as CODAN relies on output of a CDT-integrated build system to find correct way of code parsing. Anyway, embedded Linux applications usually involve kernel development, so we’ll try to find a practical approach to get the power of CODAN and Code Indexer into our hands.

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April 3, 2015

Trying out KiCAD

by Mikhail Karpenko

 

Introduction

curverd

Teardrops in KiCAD

We, at Elphel, are currently using proprietary software for schematic and PCB development and thus are not able to provide our customers with the “real” source files of our designs – pdf and gerber files only. Being free software and open hardware oriented company we would like to replace this software with open source analogues but were not able to accomplish this due to various limitations and inconveniences in design work-flow. We follow the progress in such projects as gEDA and KiCAD and made another attempt to use one them in our work. KiCAD seems to be the most promising design suite considering recent CERN contribution and active community support. I tried to design a simple element, a flexible printed circuit cable, using KiCAD and found out that the PCB design program lacks such useful feature as teardrops.

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September 10, 2014

More lenses tested: Evetar N123B05425W vs. Sunex DSL945D

by Andrey Filippov

We just tested two samples of Evetar N123B05425W lens that is very similar to Sunex DSL945D described in the previous post.

Lens Specifications

Sunex DSL945D Evetar N123B05425W
Focal length 5.5mm 5.4mm
F# 1/2.5 1/2.5
IR cutoff filter yes yes
Lens mount M12 M12
image format 1/2.3 1/2.3
Recommended sensor resolution 10Mpix 10MPix

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July 26, 2014

Lens testing at Elphel

by Andrey Filippov

We were measuring lens performance since we’ve got involved in the optical issues of the camera design. There are several blog posts about it starting with "Elphel Eyesis camera optics and lens focus adjustment". Since then we improved methods of measuring Point Spread Function (PSF) of the lenses over the full field of view using the target pattern modified from the standard checkerboard type have better spatial frequency coverage. Now we use a large (3m x 7m) pattern for the lens testing, sensor front end (SFE) alignment, camera distortion calibration and aberration measurement/correction for Eyesis series cameras.

Fig.1 PSF measured over the sensor FOV

Fig.1 PSF measured over the sensor FOV – composite image of the individual 32×32 pixel kernels

So far lens testing was performed for just two purposes – select the best quality lenses (we use approximately half of the lenses we receive) and to precisely adjust the sensor position and tilt to achieve the best resolution over the full field of view. It was sufficient for our purposes, but as we are now involved in the custom lens design it became more important to process the raw PSF data and convert it to lens parameters that we can compare against the simulated achieved during the lens design process. Such technology will also help us to fine-tune the new lens design requirements and optimization goals.

The starting point was the set of the PSF arrays calculated using images acquired from the the pattern while scanning over the range of distances from the lens to the sensor in small increments as illustrated on the animated GIF image Fig.1. The sensor surface was not aligned to be perpendicular to the optical axis of the lens before the measurement -each lens and even sensor chip has slight variations of the tilt and it is dealt with during processing of the data (and during the final alignment of the sensor during production, of course). The PSF measurement based on the repetitive pattern gives sub-pixel resolution (1.1μm in our case with 2.2μm Bayer mosaic pixel period – 4:1 up-sampled for red and blue in each direction), but there is a limit on the PSF width that the particular setup can handle. Too far out-of-focus and the pattern can not be reliably detected. That causes some artifacts on the animations made of the raw data, these PSF samples are filtered during further processing. In the end we are interested in lens performance when it is almost in perfect focus, so scanning too far away does not provide much of the practical value anyway.

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July 23, 2014

Optimization Intermediate Results

by Oleg Dzhimiev

Description

    Running OSLO’s optimization has shown that having a single operand defined is probably not enough. During the optimization run the program computes the derivative matrix for the operands and solves the least squares normal equations. The iterations are repeated with various values of the damping factor in order to determine the optimal value of the damping factor.     So, extra operands were added to split the initial error function – each new operand’s value is a contribution to the spot size (blurring) calculated for each color, aberration and certain image heights. See Fig.1 for formulas.
Fig.1 Extra Operands

Fig.1 Extra Operands

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July 1, 2014

Defining Error Function for Optical Design optimization (in OSLO)

by Oleg Dzhimiev

Description

The Error Function calculates the 4th root of the average of the 4th power spot sizes over several angles of the field of view.
t

 

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June 30, 2014

Open Hardware Lens for Eyesis4π camera

by Oleg Dzhimiev

initial_design_snapshot_2

 

Elphel has embarked on a new project, somewhat different from our main field of designing digital cameras, but closely related to the camera applications and aimed to further improve image quality of Eyesis4π camera. Eyesis4π is a high resolution full-sphere panoramic and stereophotogrammetric camera. It is a tiled multi-sensor system with a single sensor’s format of 1/2.5″. The specific requirement of such system is uniform angular resolution, since there is no center in a panoramic image. (more…)

June 20, 2014

DDR3 Memory Interface on Xilinx Zynq SOC – Free Software Compatible

by Andrey Filippov

External memory controller is an important part of many FPGA-centered designs, it is true for Elphel cameras too. When I was working on the board design for NC393 I tried to verify inteface pinout using the code output from the MIG (Memory Interface Generator) module. I was planning to use MIG code as a reference design and customize it for application in the camera, adding more functionality to our previous designs. Memory interface is a rather intimate part of the design where FPGA approach can shine it all its glory – advance knowledge of the types of needed memory transactions (in contrast with the general CPU system memory) helps to increase performance by planning bank and address sequences, crafting memory mapping to utilize close to 100% of the bus bandwidth.
eddr3_bdiag

Fig. 1. DDR3 memory controller block diagram, source code at https://github.com/Elphel/eddr3

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March 31, 2014

Elphel, inc. on trip to Geneva, Switzerland.

by Alexandre Poltorak

University of Geneva

Monday, April 14, 2014 – 18:15 at Uni-Mail, room MR070, University of Geneva. Elphel, Inc. is giving a conference entitled “High Performance Open Hardware for Scientific Applications”. Following the conference, you will be invited to attend a round-table discussion to debate the subject with people from Elphel and Javier Serrano from CERN. Javier studied Physics and Electronics Engineering. He is the head of the Hardware and Timing section in CERN’s Beams Control group, and the founder of the Open Hardware Repository. Javier has co-authored the CERN Open Hardware Licence. He and his colleagues have also recently started contributing improvements to KiCad, a free software tool for the design of Printed Circuit Boards Elphel Inc. is invited by their partner specialized in stereophotogrammetry applications – the Swiss company Foxel SA, from April 14-21 in Geneva, Switzerland. You can enjoy a virtual tour of the Geneva University by clicking on the links herein below: (make sure to use the latest version of Firefox or Chromium to view the demos) Foxel’s team would be delighted to have all of Elphel’s clients and followers to participate in the conference. A chat can also be organized in the next few days. Please contact us at Foxel SA. If you do not have the opportunity to visit us in Geneva, the conference will be streamed live and the recording will be available.

December 17, 2013

NC393 development progress – the initial software

by Andrey Filippov

The software used in the previous Elphel cameras was based on the GNU/Linux distribution supported By Axis Communications for their ETRAX processors. Of course it was heavily modified, we developed new code and ported many applications to run in the camera. Over the years we worked on making it easier to install, use and update, provided customized Live GNU/Linux distributions so those with zero experience with this operating system can still use the camera development software. Originally we used Knoppix-based CD, then DVD, then switched to Kubuntu when it became available and stable. And DVDs were eventually replaced by the USB flash drives. (more…)
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