July 11, 2016

I will not have to learn SystemVerilog

by Andrey Filippov

Or at least larger (verification) part of it – interfaces, packages and a few other synthesizable features are very useful to reduce size of Verilog code and make it easier to maintain. We now are able to run production target system Python code with Cocotb simulation over BSD sockets.

Client-server simulation of NC393 with Cocotb

Client-server simulation of NC393 with Cocotb


Previous workflow

Before switching to Cocotb our FPGA-related workflow involved:

  1. Creating RTL design code
  2. Writing Verilog tests
  3. Running simulations
  4. Synthesizing and creating bitfile
  5. Re-writing test code to run on the target system in Python
  6. Developing kernel drivers to support the FPGA functionality
  7. Developing applications that access FPGA functionality through the kernel drivers

Of course the steps are not that linear, there are hundreds of loops between steps 1 and 3 (editing RTL source after finding errors at step 3), almost as many from 5 to 1 (when the problems reveal themselves during hardware testing) but few are noticed only at step 6 or 7. Steps 2, 5, 6+7 involve a gross violation of DRY principle, especially the first two. The last steps sufficiently differ from step 5 as their purpose is different – while Python tests are made to reveal the potential problems including infrequent conditions, drivers only use a subset of functionality and try to “hide” problems – perform recovering actions to maintain operation of the device after abnormal condition occurs.
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